Lambton Panes Kits, And How to Get Them

There’s something new and exciting coming soon! I’ve been working on a collaboration with Lola from Third Vault Yarns to bring you a pattern that’s going to knock your socks off. But first, a bit of backstory.

Lola and I go to the same southwest London knit night, hosted by the lovely Rachel and Allison from Yarn in the City. I’ve been attending this weekly get together as much as possible since moving, as it’s been a great way for me to meet like-minded people in the new city/country/continent. I’ve gotten to know Lola and admire her mad yarn-dyeing skills over this time.

Recently, Lola mentioned that she was going to have a stand at the upcoming Fibre East in Ampthill, Bedfordshire. We started discussing working together to come up with some new patterns and colourways to package into kits to sell at the show. After brainstorming, we came up with the idea of a shawl using two skeins of Third Vault Yarns Companion 4ply, one in a gradient and one in a complimentary neutral shade. I left that knit night with some of that buttery-soft yarn and started swatching, and Lola went to the dye pots and got to dyeing.

What we’ve come up with is the Lambton Panes shawl. It features traveling, slipped stitches over a background of garter stitch stripes, creating a diamond lattice effect.

Hero

The sample is knit with one skein of Blue Steel as the neutral stripes and traveling stitches, and one skein of Cowtown, a custom gradient using my brand colours, for contrast stripes. I’m so excited that Lola created such a cool colourway using the shades of salmon, wheat, and aqua from my brand.

So, where are we going with this? Lola has been dyeing yarns in some gorgeous gradients and semi-solids. She’s made up some of the Cowtown gradient as well as The Poisoned Apple (left) and Hawkeye (right). I’ve seen them in person and I must say, they’re even more gorgeous in real life.

I’ve been working through the editing, testing, and printing process. I’ve already had one tester finish and it’s so pretty!

So here are the important details. The pattern will be released to the general public on Friday, July 29th, for digital download either through Ravelry, LoveKnitting.com, or here on my website. If you’re lucky enough to be attending Fibre East, you can get your hands on a kit (one gradient, one neutral, 8 stitch markers, and a print copy of the pattern) in person on July 30th or 31st, while supplies last. Or, you can visit Third Vault Yarns starting Wednesday, July 13th, and pre-order your kit for delivery after Fibre East.

That’s all the details for now. Stayed tuned here for more news on another collaboration to be unveiled at Fibre East.

Tubular Cast On Tutorial (for working flat)

The Tubular Cast On is a magical little CO that is nice and stretchy, and blends oh so beautifully into 1×1 ribbing. It is great for starting top-down socks, bottom-up sleeves, hats, and anywhere you need a stretchy edge for ribbing.

finished look1

 

My upcoming release, Jodi’s Sweater, calls for the Tubular CO on the bottom of the back panel. I’ve added this photo tutorial to the back of the pattern for those that might need a little visual help, and I thought I’d share it with you too.

It starts off with scrap yarn and a regular CO (I use long tail) that will be pulled out later. This initial CO creates your knit stitches, and then you will increase by creating the purl stitches. A few rows of slipping and working alternate sts will magically lock everything into place and then you’ll be able to remove the scrap yarn without the whole thing unravelling. See, I said it was magic!

What you’ll need: Scrap yarn, needles required from the pattern for ribbing (or a even a size smaller).

You’ll also need to calculate the number of initial CO sts. Take the number of required sts for the pattern (must be an odd number), subtract 1, divide by 2 (this will give you an even number), and add 1 back on (odd number). For example, my sweater calls for casting on 149 sts, so I will initially CO 75 with my scrap yarn (149-1 = 148, 148 / 2 = 74, 74 + 1 = 75). This will be your initial CO number. If your pattern calls for an even number of sts you could initially CO half the required sts plus 1, then decrease that extra st at a later point.

Abbreviations: CO – Cast On;  K – knit;  M1PL – Make a left-leaning purl stitch by picking up the bar between the next stitch and the previous stitch from front to back, and purling it through the back loop;  RS – Right Side;  sl – slip stitch purlwise;  st(s) – stitch(es);  WS – Wrong Side;  wyif – with yarn in front.

Instructions:

With scrap yarn, and using your favourite cast on, CO your initial CO number.

waste yarn CO

Now switch to the pattern yarn.

Purl 1 row.

Purl 1st row

Increase Row (RS): {K1, M1PL} to last stitch, K1. [you will now have the number of sts called for in the pattern]

Increase Row

Row 3 (WS): {sl1 wyif, K1} to last stitch, sl1 wyif.

After 2 rows of slipping

Row 4 (RS): {K1, sl1 wyif} to last st, K1.

Row 5: Repeat Row 3.

And you’re done! Continue on to the pattern as written. The scrap yarn can be removed at any point after this and the stitches will not unravel.

Have fun with your new CO technique, it’s my favourite!

The Pippa Toque

I’ve decided to start hosting the Pippa Toque pattern on my website. The pattern is still the same, it’s just downloadable from here now. Scroll down to the bottom of the post for the download link.

Pippa Hero cropped

The Pippa Toque is a cute little hat to keep heads and ears toasty and warm on cold winter days. The close stitches and stranded colour work make this a nice thick fabric for great insulation.

You can find a photo tutorial for making pompoms here in the Tutorials section of the website.

Suggested Yarn
Jil Eaton Minnow Merino; 100% Extra Fine Superwash Merino; 77 yds 70 m / 1.76 oz 50 g.
MC: 2 skeins of Mango (4751).
CC’s: Less than 20 yds each of Elderberry (4727), Snow White (4701), Pinque (4789), Light Blue (4747), and Peacock (4709).

Needles
US #8 5 mm 16” (40 cm) circular and DPNs, long circular for magic loop or two circulars—or size needed to obtain gauge as listed.
US #6 4 mm 16” (40 cm) circular—or 2 sizes smaller than that needed to obtain gauge.

Notions
Stitch marker, tapestry needle.

Gauge
23 stitches and 26 rows / 4 inches 10 cm in Chart 2, blocked.

Sizes
Finished measurement: 13.5 (15.75, 18, 20.25, 22.5)” / 34.5 (40, 45.5, 51.5, 57) cm circumference. Intended to be worn with 1” 2.5 cm of negative ease.
Note: Sample is shown in 18” 45.5 cm.

Skill Level
Intermediate: requires ability to work in the round, stranded colourwork, various increases and decreases.

Click the link below to download the pdf. I hope you enjoy the pattern and the hat!

Pippa Toque V3.1

Or maybe this hero

Naming Contest!

I am excited to let you all know that I’m going to be releasing a new pattern soon! It will be the first in a three-pattern collection centered around a cable motif. The first pattern will be for a throw that’s worked up in gorgeous super-bulky Cascade Magnum. The other two will be pillow covers made with Cascade 220 Superwash. I’m so thrilled with how the first sample came out and am excited to be working on the others.

Here’s my problem: I have absolutely no idea what to name the patterns or the collection. I sat in front of the computer last night for an hour and still came up with nothing but ridiculousness. Seriously, I had convinced myself to name the collection Charles Cable III – with the throw being called Chuck and the pillows Chaz and Charlie. I really need some help.

Here’s my solution: I’m going get someone else to do the naming.

Here’s what you need to do: If you’re a Ravelry member, head on over to the contest thread, read the details, respond to the post with your awesome suggestions. If you’re not a Ravelry member and would like to participate, you can do so by responding to this post.

Here’s what I’m looking for: 4 names – one for the whole collection, one for the throw, one each for the pillow covers.

Here’s what you’ll get: I’ll be picking 2 winners – 1 for the best set of names, 1 randomly chosen from all the entries. Both winners will receive the entire collection when it is released.

And now for some details to get your creative juices flowing:

The colourway for the throw is called Birch, and the colourway for the pillows is called Pacific.

Here’s a picture of the throw:

DSC05044

So hit me with your best suggestions! Can’t wait to see what you all come up with!

Pompom Tutorial

I’ve been working on updating the Pippa Toque pattern over the last few days. It was one of my first patterns so it left a bit to be desired, including being worked in a yarn that had been discontinued. I thought it might be a good idea to clean it up a bit, work up a new sample in a current yarn, and put it into my new pattern layout.

I also decided that I didn’t need to include the photo tutorial for the pompom in the pattern. Instead, I’m now going to put the tutorial up here so that it can be accessed by anyone. I can now include a link in my patterns to the tutorial. Easy peasy!

Making a pompom is also easy peasy. Check it out…

starting pompom

Pull a long strand of each colour of yarn from the balls and hold together, laying across your fingers.

winding pompom

Wind around your fingers 15 to 20 times. (If you’re only using one colour you’ll want to do more like 100 wraps).

tying pompom

Cut a 12″ length of yarn. Push one end between your middle two fingers, wrap around the strands at the center and tie very tightly.

uncut pompom

Do not cut off ends of this tie.

cutting pompom

With sharp scissors, cut through the center of the loops on either side of the tie.

untrimmed pompom

The resulting pompom will be a little messy and uneven.

finished pompom

Give it a good fluff and then, using your scissors, give it a trim to make it a nice round ball. Using the long ends of the strand tied around the middle of the pompom, tie the pompom tightly to the top of the hat. Weave in the ends.

Good stuff, eh?