The James Cowl

I know it’s been quiet around here lately, but that’s because I’ve been a busy beaver. I have just released my newest pattern, the James Cowl.Peeking hero

The James Cowl is a cozy neck warmer featuring stranded colourwork, knit in the round. It is suitable for boys and girls, men or women, young or old. While this is a great project for first time steekers, instructions are also given for an unsteeked version that is simply knit in the round.

great open shot

This cowl was originally designed to keep small kids’ necks warm while avoiding the risk of them being strangled accidentally. The magnetic closures are strong enough to keep the cowl closed for normal use, but will open if for some reason it gets caught on something. The construction of the button band ensures that the magnetic snaps are safe and secure while also concealing their backings.

Nice profile

Thanks yet again to Ryan Barr for the photography. Every time we do these photo shoots I get great pictures and a chance to hang out with an old friend!

laid out

I also couldn’t do this without the great tech editing from Eleanor Dixon.

Faraway look on bridge

Mariette Scarf

Time for a new pattern!

side-drape hero

I can’t help but think that cashmere feels the need to be touched just as much as we feel the need to touch it. What better place to have it rest than around your neck, giving you a warm hug on blustery days. This beautiful variegated yarn calls for a simple stitch pattern so the colours can be the star of the show. Add a couple of chunky buttons for a little extra interest and you’ve got a soft, stylish accessory to show off all winter long.

Scarf on a Tree

Mariette is worked flat in seed stitch – TV knitting at its best! Buttons are sewn on near the cast-on edge. The scarf is intended to be wrapped around the neck two times and then buttoned closed, echoing the infinity-scarf style without having to cast on 300 stitches.

Scarf on the Snow

As usual, you can buy my pattern here on the blog or through my Ravelry store. Thanks to Elenor Dixon for technical editing and Ryan Barr for the lovely photos.