Atticus Pullover

It’s knitting season again! I know, it’s really hot now, but fall is just around the corner. Now is the time to start that new sweater so that it’s ready for when those crisp days set in. With fall comes school, which calls for back to school clothes. So let me ever-so-modestly suggest you knit your little ones an Atticus Pullover to keep them warm at the bus stop this year.

A Mother’s Side Note: I’m so excited that I can finally share these pictures of Atticus. He’s so freakin’ cute in them it kills me!

Hero

My boy likes a lot of colour, and would be quite happy to wear the whole rainbow all the time. This is my toned-down version of his vision, lots of colour but not so much that your eyes cross.
The sweater is very simple but the stripe pattern makes it lots of fun. The piece is designed with generous ease to fit over a shirt and to grow with the child.

Other great front picture

The sample was knit in Cascade 220, a worsted-weight, 100% wool yarn. The pattern is written in 8 sizes, from 2 to 16, and fits with about 4″ of ease.

Close up

Thanks goes out again to Eleanor Dixon for Technical Editing, and to all my wonderful testers! I hope you all enjoy this new pattern as much as I do!

Back

The pattern is $6.00 US, but is on sale for $3.00 until midnight MST on August 17th.

Introducing Chum’s Pullover

Let’s start the new year off right with a new pattern release! This one has been a really long time coming so I’m over-the-moon thrilled to finally get it out there. Without further ado, let me introduce you to Chum’s Pullover…

Full Frontal

Chum’s Pullover is a stylish yet casual men’s sweater featuring a triangular-shaped placket and chunky buttons. The placket adds a touch of interest and style to the piece that is manly enough for even the toughest of men. It is knit in bulky yarn, making relatively short work of a man-sized garment. The piece would look great with a pair of jeans, battered and old or crisp and sleek. It would also pair well with a pop of colour like red denim, if that’s the way you roll.

Placket Detail

The sweater is worked in the round from the bottom to the underarm, then the left front, right front (including placket) and back are worked individually and joined at the shoulders with Kitchener stitch. The set-in sleeves are worked flat from the cuff up and then seamed and attached to the body of the sweater. The neck flap and high neckline are finished with a crocheted edge to give the piece a nice, clean look.

Open Collar

The sample shown in the picture is worn with zero ease, and that is how the pattern is written. For a little extra room, I recommend knitting the next size up.

From now until midnight MST on January 11th the pattern is available for 25% off.

Under the bridge

PS – Look how hot Chum looks! I’m a lucky lady!

Featured Indie Designer – Elizabeth Green Musselman

This is an extra-special Featured Indie Designer post for a couple of reasons. Firstly, it includes an interview with the lovely Elizabeth Green Musselman of Dark Matter Knits. Secondly, it features a fantastic giveaway, which you can read about at the end of the post.

Without further ado, I’ll let Elizabeth speak for herself since she gave such great answers to my questions…

1) Tell us a little about yourself.
I’ve had a pretty itinerant life. I grew up in an Army family, so we moved about once every two years, which in some ways was tough, but I did get to live in Germany for six years in junior high and high school, and that was an amazing experience. At various times, I’ve wanted to be an architect, aeronautical engineer, and science journalist, but through some funny twists and turns ended up getting a Ph.D. in the history of science, and for 13 years I taught history at Southwestern University, a wonderful liberal arts college near my current home in Austin, Texas. I needed a change, though, and two years ago, I quit that job to pursue a career as a freelance knitting designer, editor, and teacher. I’m now the book designer for Cooperative Press, design knitting patterns with a focus on men and boys under the moniker Dark Matter Knits, do graphic design work for people in the fiber industry, and teach knitting classes. My sweet husband is a philosophy professor at another liberal arts college in town, and our nine-year-old son is one of the funniest, quirkiest people I have ever known. I pretty much adore him with every woolly fiber of my being.
2) How did you start designing?
 That started about five years ago. I had been knitting for a long time (about 25 years at that point), so I’d been fascinated to watch how the internet exploded the world of knitting design. I’d always thought of pattern design as something that only a select few professionals did, but in the mid-1990s, I started seeing younger women and men who’d been knitting for just one or two years getting their designs out there, and I thought, “Why on earth am I not doing this? It looks like so much fun!” Since I have two guys in my life whom I love to knit for, I thought I’d find a niche by focusing on designs for men and school-aged boys.
3) Which is your favorite of your designs?
That’s a tough one to answer, and I’d probably have a completely different answer tomorrow, but today I’ll choose my Modern Tartan sweater. I designed that for a pattern collection published by Hill Country Weavers, one of my LYSes and one of just a handful of stores that carries Jared Flood’s Shelter yarn. The challenge in my case was to create something for men with Shelter. I knew Flood would publish his own designs, and knew the muted, classic aesthetic he would choose, so I decided to go for something completely different: a colorful, vibrant, graphic look. I kept experimenting until I hit upon a combination of vertical and horizontal stripes that I liked. Then I structured the garment to look and fit like one of those zip-neck fleece pullovers.

https://i0.wp.com/farm6.static.flickr.com/5245/5288854216_5d644fc005_b.jpg

My favorite of the designs that I included in the GAL—that is, of my self-published designs—might be my Cattywampus Hat. I love unusual constructions that are simple to knit, and this hat is a perfect example of that. The hat is worked up and down, and simple short rows and decrease/increase combinations are used to shape the crown and creates the biasing effect.
https://i0.wp.com/images4.ravelry.com/uploads/elizabethgm/166889852/CattywampusHat_red1.jpg
4) What has been your favorite part of the GAL so far?
I’ve been delighted by how much community has formed around it; I didn’t expect that. Not only have the designers themselves really pitched in to make this work incredibly successfully—Lindsay Lewchuk (aka ecochicknits) deserves particular credit for that—but also people who have purchased the patterns are having a wonderful time participating in all the KAL/CALs and playing the various games that the organizers have come up with. It’s been a huge success.
5) Are you doing any gift knitting this year?

A little—I tend not to plan on any, except gifts for my son’s teachers, but I get as many gifts knit or crocheted as I can. This year it’s looking like I’m not going to get very far! I’m sure none of you know the feeling….

 

I’d like to thank Elizabeth for such a great interview, it was a pleasure.

And now for the giveaway! Elizabeth was gracious enough to offer a copy of her Cattywampus Hat pattern to one of my lucky readers. Just leave a comment below telling us which of her patterns is your favorite before Dec. 21st at 11:59 pm EST.  I’ll do a random number draw and will announce the lucky winner the next day. Good luck!

Introducing Hearts and Butterflies

New pattern day!

happy eloise

Despite my best efforts, my little girl is as girly as they come. When asked what she wanted on her hat the answer was definitively “Hearts, with a butterfly on top.” Well, my girl, ask and ye shall receive. I present you with the girliest hat ever.

Hearts and Butterflies
This hat features an all-over heart design knit using stranded colorwork. The bottom of the hat is hemmed, providing a nice thick band to keep ears nice and toasty on cold days. There are also instructions for the optional butterfly to be sewn on after.

Hero Shot

Sizes:   Preemie (Newborn, Baby, Toddler, Child or Teen, Adult), fits 12 (14, 16, 18, 20, 22)” [30 (35, 40, 45, 50, 55) cm] circumference.

Another big thanks goes out to Eleanor Dixon for technical editing, and to the adorable Eloise (aka Doodie) for modeling!

From now until the end of Saturday, Dec. 7th, the pattern is available for 50% off!

And don’t forget, this is also eligible for all the Gift-A-Long fun!

Introducing: They’re Paisley!

I know, I can’t believe it either, two patterns released in one week! I never thought I’d see that happen.

So let’s get to it. I’m pleased to introduce you to the latest Cowtownknits creation: They’re Paisley!

With pants

Paisley is so hot right now. Really. I kept seeing all these beautiful paisley prints in shop windows and on fashionable bodies and I thought – “Why couldn’t I knit me some paisley somethings?” And then I thought – “Mittens, those somethings should be mittens!” And that’s that. I designed some paisley mittens.

Hero with me in the background

The pattern has four charts: one paisley chart for each hand (the chart is reversed on the other hand), one for the palm, and one for the thumb gusset.

Size: Medium – 8″ / 20.5 cm palm circumference

Front and back stacked


You can purchase the pattern by clicking the “buy now” button above. Until November 15 you can receive a 25% discount when you checkout using the coupon code giftalong. Then you should come and join the Gift-A-Long fun on Ravelry and have a chance at some of the hundreds of prizes. That’s right, I said hundreds.

This time both technical editing and test knitting were brought to you by the lovely Alana Marchetto.